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Archived News

July 2014

NASA TEERM Demonstrates an Innovative Site Characterization and Remediation Technology
NASA TEERM is working with Stennis Space Center (SSC) and the developer of an innovative site characterization and remediation technology to address subsurface contamination at SSC. The technology, a combination of multiport groundwater sampling and remedial reagent injection well, is being demonstrated on an area of contaminated groundwater. The newly-developed well technology was installed using Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) techniques and will allow for more accurate determination of the discrete locations and magnitudes of contaminant sources when compared to traditional wells installed either horizontally or vertically. The innovative design will serve a dual purpose; a site characterization well to identify contaminant sources and then as a remediation well to precisely inject chemicals that will destroy those sources.

May 2014

Next phase of TEERM Hexavalent Chrome-free Coatings for Electronics Project is underway.
Working jointly with technical representatives from NASA, the Department and Defense, and industry, the Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) Principal Center is evaluating the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. This project is assessing the performance of trivalent chromium pretreatments against a hexavalent chrome pretreatment control material before and after environmental exposure. TEERM is currently working project stakeholders to finalize the test plan for this project.

April 2014

International Meetings with DLR and ESA
NASA TEERM, along with HQ Senior Managers from the Environmental Management Division, participated in meetings with the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Cologne, Germany and the European Space Agency and Technology Center in Noordwijk, Netherlands. The meetings with DLR resulted in opportunities that are of mutual interest in evaluating environmental technologies. The scope of these activities fit within an existing agreement between NASA and DLR. The importance of meeting with ESA was to discuss several topics, including the status of an international agreement between NASA and ESA in support of joint testing. Additional benefits from meeting face-to-face with our international partners were the verbal commitments to participate in the 12th Annual International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy, October 21 - 24, 2014 at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.

March 2014

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Bus
TEERM assisted with the acquisition of a low-mileage hydrogen fuel cell electric bus that was transported from the U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratory. The bus is located at the KSC Ground Operations Demonstration Units site with plans to use it as a components-level test bed for evaluating novel technologies for energy generation and storage. Future plans may include occasional VIP transportation. To transport the bus from its DoD demonstration site in Washington state, NASA only had to cover the transportation costs. KSC is developing a near term assessment plan of the bus condition and adaptability to the proposed test bed usage. An engineer from the bus manufacturer, Proterra, will be visiting in April to address any questions or concerns with the vehicle.

February 2014

Lead-free (Pb) Electronics Risk Management (PERM) Council Meeting Hosted by KSC and TEERM
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) Principal Center hosted a Lead-free (Pb) Electronics Risk Management (PERM) Council meeting February 11 – 13 at NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida. PERM is comprised of members representing industry, Government and academic organizations who have a common interest in managing the risks of Pb-free electronics in aerospace, defense, and high performance electronic systems. This was the 19th PERM meeting that typically occurs on a tri-annual basis where the council members take a turn planning and hosting the meeting. Participants, including TEERM, presented their latest findings and recommendations from their respective Pb-free electronics risk management activities. There were 65 attendees representing 40 different organizations, both domestic and foreign.

December 2013

Backup Power Fuel Cells at KSC
TEERM has helped NASA Kennedy Space Center secure three backup fuel cells from an energy technology demonstration program managed by the U.S. Army Construction Engineering for the U.S. Department of Energy. The 15KW fuel cells (one 6KW, one 5KW, one 4KW) are brand new and were never used. The units are now at KSC and will be used to evaluate the effectiveness and reliability of fuel cells for backup power.

October 2013

2013 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON ENVIRONMENT AND ALTERNATIVE ENERGY WAS A GREAT SUCCESS!
NASA and European partners held the 11th annual International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy, October 22 – 25, 2013 at The European Space Agency (ESA)'s European Space Research Institute (ESRIN) facility in Frascati, Italy. The theme of the workshop was "Increasing Space Mission Resiliency through Sustainability." This event was supported by the European Space Agency (ESA), the Portuguese Center for Pollution Prevention (C3P), and the Fundação Luso Americana (FLAD). U.S. and international subject matter experts presented on the topics of Increasing Space Mission Critical Ground Infrastructure Resiliency through Sustainability, and Environmentally-Driven Changes to Aerospace Materials & Process Management including Corrosion Protection and Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical (REACH) Regulation. The workshop also included a panel discussion on the topic of Sustainability as a Policy Tool. Awards are typically given to the three student poster presentations judged to be the best; however, this year’s student poster presentations were so excellent, that the judges could not narrow it down to only three, so four students were given awards.

August 2013

NASA Alternatives to Hexavalent Chrome Containing Coatings Demonstration – Wallops Flight Facility P-3 Aircraft
A joint Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) project with NAVAIR's Materials Engineering Division has begun flight testing hexavalent chrome free coatings on exterior components of two NASA aircraft. Seven of nine aluminum access panels are fully hexavalent chrome free and two components serve as controls with hexavalent chrome pretreatments and primers. The components were installed in late 2012 and initial inspection on the P-3 aircraft took place in early 2013, only a short time after the components had been placed on vehicle. The second inspection of NASA's P-3 at Wallops Flight Facility took place in July 2013. Engineers inspected the panels for signs of corrosion and wear and took measurements of color, gloss and coating thickness. After over six months of exposure on the aircraft, and 307 flight hours, all coatings are performing well with no deleterious effects. The next inspection will take place in the 4th quarter of 2013 when the P-3 returns to Wallops Flight Facility. Additionally, a second aircraft, NASA's C-23 Sherpa will also be inspected in the 4th quarter of 2013. It was not inspected in July as it is still on mission in Alaska.

July 2013

Ground Support Development and Operations (GSDO) Program Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives
The NASA TEERM Ground Support Development and Operations (GSDO) Program Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives Project is evaluating and testing non-chromated pretreatments as replacements for hexavalent chrome pretreatments used on Ground Support Equipment (GSE) and Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE). Following 35 days of exposure at the KSC Beachfront and ambient office storage, the test articles were evaluated for electrical bonding properties. To date, the non-chromated pretreatments have been outperforming the hexavalent chrome pretreatments. Testing continues and the test articles will be evaluated again following 70 days of exposure at the KSC Beachfront and ambient office storage.

June 2013

NASA and European Partners International Workshop - Plans are underway for the International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy, "Increasing Space Mission Resiliency through Sustainability", October 22 – 25, 2013. The Workshop will be held at the European Space Agency - European Space Research Institute (ESRIN) in Frascati, Italy, about 20 kilometers (12 miles) outside of Rome. This four-day event will highlight work that ESA, NASA, and various partners are conducting to make ground-based space operations more robust and resilient, and provide a forum for others to present on similar topics. For more information please visit the TEERM Workshop website: http://teerm.nasa.gov/workshop.htm

May 2013

GSDO Program Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation Project to be Presented at DoD Corrosion Conference
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) is working with the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program (GSDOP), Kennedy Space Center (KSC), other NASA Centers and the Department of Defense (DoD) to qualify citric acid as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys. An abstract, prepared by NASA TEERM, was accepted by the DoD Corrosion Conference 2013 to be held September 16-17 via webinar. NASA TEERM is working with the NASA Corrosion Technology Laboratory to prepare a manuscript and presentation giving an overview of the project and results to date. Passivation is used to make a surface more "passive" so it is not as affected by corrosion and other environmental factors. While nitric acid results in excellent corrosion resistance, there are a number of environmental, safety, and operational issues. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits, including being bio-degradable, non-hazardous, and less aggressive.

March 2013

NASA Remedial Project Manager Workshop - The 2013 NASA Remedial Project Manager (RPM) Workshop was held February 25-28, 2013 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This biennial event provided an excellent forum for RPMs to present their program updates and to engage with RPMs from other Centers and Component Facilities, as well as their Advocates at NASA HQ Environmental Management Division. TEERM’s contribution to this year’s workshop was successful in identifying and inviting guest speakers who could present on topics of significant interest. These speakers and their presentations were well received and generated several side discussions afterwards with potential for collaborative projects in the near future.

February 2013

Reuse of Non-Hazardous Spent Blast Media in Concrete Being Demonstrated at KSC – A joint Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) project with Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Construction of Facilities and KSC’s Environmental Management System is set to begin construction at the Propellants North area of KSC in March 2013. The objective of this project is to validate a process that utilizes spent blast media as an alternative aggregate in specific concrete mixes. At times, spent blast media has been one of KSC’s largest waste streams. This diversion of non-hazardous spent blast media from the current method of disposal as solid waste may help NASA meet the requirements of Executive Order 31514 as well as avoid costs. The 2012 KSC Sustainability Plan stipulates that future contract language include provisions to implement the blast media in concrete process. A pre-work meeting with NASA representatives and the construction contractor was recently held.

January 2013

Early Testing Complete on Hexavalent Chrome-free Coatings for Electronics - Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) initial testing of hexavalent chromium-free pretreatments has been completed, including testing of several pretreatments provided by the European Space Agency (ESA). Results from initial testing have brought panel preparation procedures into question. The hexavalent chrome control pretreatment unexpectedly failed during corrosion testing. There were also unexpected failures for some of the hexavalent chromium-free pretreatments. However, several lower TRL materials performed well during initial salt spray testing. The next phase of the project will focus on panel preparation procedures for selected hexavalent chromium-free pretreatments and the hexavalent chrome control pretreatment. Test panels with hexavalent chromium-free pretreatments will be submitted by ESA. Vendors will be supplying test panels with newly developed hexavalent chromium-free pretreatments as well.

December 2012

NASA TEERM helped execute an International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy on December 4-7, 2012 at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland.
The event was supported by NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Portuguese Center for Pollution Prevention (C3P). TEERM also helped with the event’s planning and coordination. The theme of the workshop was "Enabling Sustainable Space Exploration".

More than 100 individuals from eight countries attended the workshop. Thirteen students from around the globe gave either oral or poster presentations during the technical or student sessions on the latest technologies during the environmental and alternative energy workshop. Judges from NASA, C3P and ESA awarded certificates to the top three students.

In addition to the students, 36 U.S. and international subject matter experts presented on the following general environmental-related topics:

  • Quantification of Green Roofs’ Contributions to Building and Community Performance
  • Environmentally-Driven Changes to Aerospace Materials and Processes
  • Facility Energy Supply Solutions for Critical Applications including Energy Security
  • Use of Life Cycle Assessments (LCA) in Aerospace Applications

November 2012

Completed Project, NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics, results in valuable test data.
NASA TEERM recently completed the NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project. This multi-agency effort led by NASA involved extensive testing (thermal cycle, vibration, drop, and mechanical) and assessment of the electrical reliability of circuit cards assembled and reworked with lead-free and mixed (lead-free/SnPb) solder alloys. The test program comprised about 500 combinations of solder alloys, surface finishes, electronic components, and test conditions. The results of testing showed that SnPb and Pb-free solder joint integrity is dependent on the environmental conditions to which the circuit card is subjected. An example of this dependence is that the -20°C to +80°C thermal cycle test results can be different than those for the -55°C to +125°C thermal cycling. This is because each test environment creates a different level of stress on the component solder joints. All test reports and associated data can be found at: http://teerm.nasa.gov/nasa_dodleadfreeelectronics_proj2.htm.

October 2012

NASA TEERM is working with NASA Centers and Air Force Space Command to evaluate coatings for corrosion protection of launch facilities and ground support equipment.
NASA TEERM is working with NASA Centers (KSC, Stennis Space Center, Wallops Flight Facility, White Sands Test Facility), the NASA Corrosion Technology Laboratory (CTL), the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program (GSDOP), and Air Force Space Command to evaluate coatings for corrosion protection of launch facilities and ground support equipment. Application of coatings to test panels began in June, and those test panels have been placed at the KSC Beachside Corrosion Test Bed where they will be evaluated over 18 months. The purpose of this atmospheric exposure test is to determine how well the coating alternatives provide corrosion protection while maintaining their color and gloss in a harsh environment. All coating alternatives are commercially available and were evaluated for volatile organic compounds, hazardous air pollutants and other environmental considerations prior to their selection.

Successful field demonstration of In Situ Chemical Oxidation to remediate TCE and associated VOC contamination at SCC leads to full-scale implementation.
TEERM completed a field demonstration of In Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) to remediate trichloroethylene (TCE) and associated volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in saturated soil and groundwater at Stennis Space Center (SSC). The innovative ISCO process entailed the automated injection of hydrogen peroxide and a proprietary catalyst to produce oxidizing hydroxyl radicals. The injection rate was adjusted to achieve maximum oxidant contact with the contaminants and required approximately four months to inject approximately 4,000 lbs of reagent. The results indicated a 100% reduction of residual contaminant mass in saturated soil and approximately 50% reduction of groundwater concentrations within the treatment zone. The process has transitioned to full-scale implementation at SSC.

September 2012

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light Tower at Kennedy Space Center
On September 11, 2012 NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) engineers took final photographs and conducted a corrosion inspection of the hydrogen fuel cell mobile lighting tower with the cooperation of KSC Corrosion Technology Laboratory personnel. Over the past year the Department of Energy-funded hydrogen fuel cell mobile light “beta” system underwent successful operational testing by Institutional Services Contract (ISC) personnel at Kennedy Space Center. The objective of the testing was to observe operation of the tower in a hot, humid, and corrosive environment by collecting periodic photo documentation, visually inspect for corrosion, and send findings and user feedback to the product development team led by Sandia National Laboratory. The innovatively powered light tower features high-efficiency plasma lighting and a hydrogen fuel cell to significantly reduce noise, eliminate diesel particulate emissions, increase energy efficiency; and afford both indoor and outdoor operation. The plasma lighting's improved color rendition can potentially provide a safer working environment by enhancing visual acuity.

July 2012

2012 International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy
Registration is now OPEN for the 2012 International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy -
“Enabling Sustainable Space Exploration” to be held at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, December 4 - 7, 2012.
Please visit our workshop web page - http://www.teerm.nasa.gov/workshop.htm - to register. 
If you would like to submit an abstract for consideration to present, please contact Michelle Lamb at lamb@itb-inc.com

May 2012

Testing Begins on NASA TEERM/GSDOP Project to Qualify Citric Acid Passivation
NASA TEERM has initiated a project to qualify citric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.  Passivation is used to make a surface more "passive" so it is not as affected by corrosion and other environmental factors.  While nitric acid results in excellent corrosion resistance, there are a number of environmental, safety, and operational issues.  Citric acid offers a variety of benefits, including being bio-degradable, non-hazardous, and less aggressive.  Participation in the project comes from various NASA Centers (Kennedy Space Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, and White Sands Test Facility), the NASA Corrosion Technology Laboratory (CTL), the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program (GSDOP), and the Department of Defense. 

April 2012

TEERM Remediation Technology Collaboration Development team visits Michoud Assembly Facility and Stennis Space Center
Members of TEERM’s Remediation Technology Collaboration Development team visited Michoud Assembly Facility and Stennis Space Center in April to support NASA’s environmental cleanup efforts. An informative tour of cleanup areas at Michoud Assembly Facility was hosted by a representative of NASA’s Logistics and Environmental Management. The direct reconnaissance of these cleanup areas provided the Remediation Technology Collaboration Development team with invaluable knowledge that will help to guide their efforts in the most effective direction. At Stennis Space Center, the Remediation Technology Collaboration Development team met with a NASA Remediation Project Manager and a facilities contractor with Jacobs Technology. The group discussed the latest results of an in situ chemical oxidation pilot test that was initiated by TEERM with remediation contractor EN Rx, Inc. A tour of the pilot test area was conducted and all were happy to learn that the test is on track and effectively reducing concentrations of trichloroethylene in groundwater.

March 2012

TEERM Hosts Tour of KSC for Industry Leaders
NASA TEERM hosted a tour of KSC for industry leaders from the Aerospace and Defense Industries Association of Europe (ASD) and the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA).  Members of ASD and AIA are vested stakeholders in numerous environmentally-driven materials substitution projects managed by TEERM.  The tour helped showcase the work that the stakeholders are making possible, including ongoing atmospheric testing of environmentally-preferable coatings at the Corrosion Beach Test Site.

February 2012

Special Visitors at Concentrated Solar Air Conditioning for Buildings Demonstration Site
The demonstration site at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Youth Center near Tucson, AZ recently hosted several prominent special visitors.  On January 13, Major General Timothy Byers, AF/A7C, USAF Civil Engineer visited to inspect ongoing renewable energy projects.  On February 3, Mayor Jonathan Rothschild accompanied Ms. Nancy Sutley, Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality during a tour of clean energy projects.  The concentrated solar collectors (parabolic troughs) will be combined with a 60-ton double-effect absorption chiller to provide cooling and reduce electrical consumption during peak power demand.  NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) is a co-investigator along with US Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center in this multiyear project funded by the Department of Defense (DoD) Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP).

December 2011

TEERM Presents at Surface Mount Technology Association
A representative from the NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) was a special guest speaker at a meeting of the Space Coast Chapter of the Surface Mount Technology Association (SMTA) on December 13, 2011.  TEERM’s presentation was on the TEERM Lead-Free Electronics project involving NASA and the DoD community.  The project was initiated to address issues with lead-free (Pb-free) components finding their way into the inventories of aerospace and military assembly processes.  Mixed inventories of tin-lead (SnPb) and Pb-free will result in increased risks associated with the manufacturing, product reliability, and subsequent repair of aerospace and military electronic systems.  The transition to Pb-free components and processes has been ongoing for over a decade without sufficient testing data to know if Pb-free is feasible for use in high reliability systems.  TEERM’s project provides the data and analysis needed to help determine reliability of Pb-free solder interconnects, including reworked and mixed (Pb-free/SnPb & SnPb/Pb-free) solder interconnects.

Joint NASA-Air Force Space Command Project Update
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM), the NASA Corrosion Technology Laboratory, and the University of Dayton Research Institute (representing the Air Force Research Laboratory) conducted an 18 month evaluation of coatings placed at the KSC Corrosion Beach Site as part of a joint NASA-Air Force Space Command project to test low volatile organic compound (VOC) content coatings for use on launch facilities and ground support equipment.  The majority of the coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance and maintained their color and gloss.  Those coating deemed acceptable will be added to the Approved Products List in NASA-STD-5008B (the specification that oversees protection of launch facilities). 

NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project News The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) organized a meeting of members of the NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics project on December 14 - 15, 2011 at Harris Corporation in Melbourne, Florida.  The two-day meeting objective of concluding discussion and agreements for incorporation of the project team’s comments into the final Joint Test Report was met.  The final report captures the team’s efforts and results from the four year NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics project.  Key project stakeholders from Rockwell Collins, Lockheed Martin, COM DEV, MSFC (Jacobs Engineering Group), Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Crane Division and Harris participated in the meeting. 

November 2011

NASA/C3P International Workshop
NASA and the Portuguese Center for Pollution Prevention (C3P) held an international technical workshop on November 15 - 18, 2011 at the European Space Agency (ESA)'s Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, The Netherlands.  NASA TEERM provided primary coordination for the event.  The workshop provided an excellent forum to showcase innovative and emerging pollution prevention and renewable energy technologies, share lessons learned, and identify new joint opportunities.  More than 110 individuals from eleven countries attended the workshop.  For the first time since the inception of NASA-C3P workshops, a full day was dedicated to a student session.  Fifteen students from around the globe gave oral presentations along with poster displays relating to the latest technologies in environmental and alternative energy strategies.  Judges from NASA, C3P and ESA awarded plaques to the top three students.

October 2011

TEERM Visit to ESTEC Facility in Netherlands
TEERM met with ESA representatives at their ESTEC facility in The Netherlands to kickoff a joint project focused on the identification and testing of alternatives to hexavalent chromium for the protection of aluminum on launchers and spacecraft. Additionally, meetings were held to identify and discuss potential areas for future collaborative projects and to aid in the planning of the upcoming NASA/C3P International Workshop.

QuEST Newsletter
The annual TEERM newsletter, QuEST, is now available on the TEERM website. The newsletter highlights projects and achievements of TEERM throughout the previous year. This year's edition discusses how TEERM identifies risks to NASA and works with our NASA, Department of Defense, international, and industry partners to find mitigation strategies. It also highlights our Materials Management and Substitution, Alternative Energy, and other efforts in the pursuit of our goals to enhance NASA mission readiness and reduce risk while minimizing duplication and associated costs.

September 2011

TEERM Presentation at PERM
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) has been an active participant in the Aerospace & Defense Pb-Free Electronics Risk Management (PERM) Consortium which was formed to address the issues surrounding lead-free electronics. On September 27, 2011 TEERM provided a NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project status presentation to the PERM at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Crane, Indiana.

August 2011

Sustainable Construction Project between NASA and C3P
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) has kicked off a collaborative project between NASA and Centro Para Prevenção da Poluição (C3P) in Portugal. Successful completion of this task will be to supply the appropriate information on NASA and U.S. best technologies and practices for sustainable construction relevant to Portugal’s ECOS Network goals for innovative and competitive cities centered on energy efficiency. The project will focus on the collection and assessment of innovative technologies and documentation of best practices proven to increase the energy efficiency of new and retrofitted buildings using renewable energies and higher efficiency products/technologies. Relevant NASA experience with such technologies will be cited, together with information provided by subject matter experts in other U.S. Federal Agencies such as the Dept of Energy (DOE), plus municipal and building industry organizations such as the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). The anticipated outcome of this NASA-C3P project will be a shared understanding and acceptance of new technologies and practices that will become new building design templates for sustainable construction. For more information please contact Al Sorkin.

July 2011

Concentrated Solar Air Conditioning for Buildings
The Concentrated Solar Air Conditioning for Buildings (EW-201018) project team has received a Letter of Acceptance of the Demonstration Plan from the Department of Defense (DoD) Environmental Security Technology Certification Program  (ESTCP) Program Office.  NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM)  is a co-investigator in the project led by US Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center .  The project will evaluate the use of concentrated solar collectors (parabolic troughs) combined with a 60-ton double-effect absorption chiller to provide air conditioning and reduce electrical consumption during peak power demand at the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Youth Center in Tucson, AZ.

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light Tower at Kennedy Space Center
On July 7 – 8, 2011 NASA TEERM engineers hosted a demonstration of the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light Tower (H2LT) at the Kennedy Space Center Press Site.  Representatives from Sandia National Laboratories, Altergy, and Straylight were available to promote the technology.  A professional photographer was on hand to capture the activities that included a visit from American Astronaut George Zamka, and an interview of the Sandia Project Manager by BBC Radio.

June 2011

2011 International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy
Registration is now open for the 2011 International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy
to be held November 15 – 18, 2011 at The European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The event is sponsored by NASA, C3P in Portugal, and the European Space Agency(ESA), and is organized through the NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) Principal Center at Kennedy Space Center, Florida.

The workshop will be geared toward scientists, engineers, academics, and students from around the world who are interested in partnering with NASA and ESA on joint projects.

Presentation topics will include:  Materials management and substitution in support of space operations, remediation technologies and strategies, emerging renewable and alternative energy technologies, encroachment risk analysis and mitigation, adaptive response to climate change, and sustainable development and redevelopment Although there is no fee to attend the workshop, registration is required. For more information, including registration and hotel reservations, please visit our Workshop page.

April 2011

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light Tower at Kennedy Space Center
On April 19, 2011 NASA TEERM engineers will facilitate the delivery of a Department of Energy-funded hydrogen fuel cell mobile light system for operational testing at Kennedy Space Center. The objective of the testing is to collect data in a hot, humid, and corrosive environment. The innovatively powered light tower features high-efficiency plasma lighting and a hydrogen fuel cell to significantly reduce noise, eliminate diesel particulate emissions, increase energy efficiency; and afford both indoor and outdoor operation. The plasma lighting's improved color rendition can potentially provide a safer working environment by enhancing visual acuity.

February 2011

Dem/Val Coating Alternatives at Vandenberg AFB
As a collaborative effort between Air Force Space Command (AFSPC), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and United Launch Alliance (ULA), representatives met at VAFB, CA to determine whether the environmentally-preferable alternative coating systems applied to Space Launch Complex 6 (SLC-6) withstood the effects of rocket launch operations, in this case, the Delta 4-Heavy.  In addition to providing high temperature resistance the coating alternatives are expected to and should require little, if any, touch-up in post-launch coatings operations.  Successful alternatives could be adopted by AFSPC and NASA for use on support equipment, launch structures, range equipment, and any other launch-related applications that use structural steel and concrete in similar environments such as the launch area.  Previously applied alternative coating systems at SLC-2W were reassessed as well.

Hexavalent Chromium Presentation at ASETS Defense Workshop
On February 9, 2011 representatives of NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) presented at the Advanced Surface Engineering Technologies for a Sustainable Defense (ASETSDefense) workshop held in New Orleans, LA. The presentation highlighted hexavalent chromium replacement efforts by Space Shuttle Program project elements and TEERM.  The representatives took the opportunity to update progress of the developing Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics project and meet with stakeholders.

Concentrated Solar Air Conditioning for Buildings (EW-201018) In Progress Review
On February 1, 2011 the Concentrated Solar Air Conditioning for Buildings (EW-201018) project team met with the Department of Defense (DoD) Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) Environmental Technical Committee for an In Progress Review (IPR).  NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) is a co-investigator in the project led by US Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center. The project will evaluate the use of concentrated solar collectors (parabolic troughs) combined with a 60-ton double-effect absorption chiller to provide air conditioning and reduce electrical consumption during peak power demand at the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Youth Center in Tucson, AZ.

January 2011

TEERM Hexavalent Chrome-free Coatings Project
NASA TEERM has initiated a project to evaluate hexavalent chrome free conversion coatings for electronics applications. The Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics project will evaluate and test coatings and coating systems (pretreatment, pretreatment with primer, and pretreatment with primer and topcoat) in several phases as replacements for hexavalent chrome coatings in avionics and electronics housing applications. This project will be accomplished by testing strong performing coatings from prior NASA and DoD testing as well as evaluating new coatings as determined by the stakeholders. Stakeholders contributing to this effort include JSC, KSC, MSFC, U.S. Navy, Lockheed Martin, Harris, Boeing, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, Rockwell Collins, Honeywell and more.

November 2010

NASA/C3P Workshop Attracts International Attention
NASA TEERM participated in a workshop and related meetings in San Diego, CA with its Portuguese partner, C3P, during the week of November 1-5, 2010. The 2010 C3P/NASA International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy was held on the campus of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). Welcoming comments were provided by distinguished speakers from NASA, UCSD and Portugal, including Portugal's Secretary of State for the Environment. Seven countries had representation in attendance, including students and professors from U.S., Portuguese, and German universities. The week's activities also comprised a tour of General Atomics and an annual meeting of the C3P Joint Oversight Group.
+ Link to Workshop Presentations

October 2010

2010 International Workshop on Environment and Energy
Registration is open for the 2010 International Workshop on Environment and Energy planned for November 2-4, 2010 on the campus of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), California. The event is sponsored by NASA, C3P in Portugal, and UCSD. The event is being organized through the NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) Principal Center at NASA Kennedy Space Center.

An exciting program is planned that will include presentations on environmental and energy matters, with a view toward collaboration. This will be a wonderful opportunity to hear distinguished international and U.S. guest speakers, workshop leaders, and students present information and ideas relevant to European and U.S. engineers and scientists interested in solving their environment and energy issues.

There is no fee to attend the workshop. For more information, including registration and hotel reservations, please visit our Workshop page.

TEERM uses Tech Needs to Identify Environmentally Friendly Coatings
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) used a Tech Needs article in NASA Tech Briefs to solicit information on environmentally friendly coatings for corrosion protection of metallic facilities, structures, and ground support equipment. The identified products should be mature, commercially available, have less than 200 grams/Liter of volatile organic compounds, and not contain hexavalent chromium, lead, cadmium, or hazardous air pollutants. Several responses from vendors are being evaluated. Viable alternatives will be considered for future validation efforts and, if qualified, added to the Qualified Products List in NASA-STD-5008 for use across NASA.

Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) is leading a multi-agency effort to qualify citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel. Citric acid has environmental, safety, and process benefits that nitric acid does not. The project team includes representatives from NASA centers and contractors, the Defense Logistics Agency, Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps. To date, the team has identified performance requirements and drafted a joint test plan. A final test plan is expected soon and will be posted to the TEERM web site.

August 2010

Solar-Powered Air Conditioning for Buildings Site Visit
On August 11, project stakeholders of the Concentrated Solar Air Conditioning for Buildings Project (EW-1018) attended a demonstration site visit and meeting at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base near Tucson, AZ. NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) , Armstrong Flight Research Center, and Johnson Space Center are participating in the project led by US Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center. The project will evaluate the use of concentrated solar collectors (parabolic troughs) combined with a 60-ton double-effect absorption chiller to provide air conditioning and reduce electrical consumption during peak power demand. Data collected will benefit NASA and DoD in prioritizing facilities and locations for possible future implementation, and there could also be implications for space exploration.

July 2010

NASA HQ EMD Energy and Water Management Functional Review (EWMFR)
NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM), engineers traveled to NASA's Glen Research Center (GRC) at Lewis Field in Cleveland, Ohio, and Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, to assist NASA HQ Environmental Management Division (EMD) from July 18th through August 4th in conducting their management review to asses GRC's progress in meeting agency goals and policies regarding energy and water conservation, as well as renewable energy use. These reviews are congressionally mandated, and are a way to make sure these goals and policies are kept up to date as well as being met to help NASA reduce its overall energy and water use, while subsequently increase its use of renewable energy. The process is a personal interview-type exchange for NASA HQ to better understand the challenges each center has in meeting the agency's goals as well as facilitate a positive exchange of ideas on reducing NASA's overall energy and water demand.

Solar-Powered Air Conditioning for Buildings Kickoff On July 29, a kickoff meeting was held with project stakeholders on a Concentrated Solar Air Conditioning for Buildings Project (SI-1018). The project sponsor is the Department of Defense (DoD) Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP). NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM), Armstrong Flight Research Center, and Johnson Space Center are participating in the project led by US Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center US Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center. The project will evaluate the use of concentrated solar collectors (parabolic troughs) combined with a 60-ton double-effect absorption chiller to provide air conditioning and reduce electrical consumption during peak power demand. The selected demonstration site is a building at the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base near Tucson, AZ. Data collected will benefit NASA and DoD in prioritizing facilities and locations for possible future implementation, and there could also be implications for space exploration.

June 2010

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project at Kennedy Space Center
On June 4, 2010, NASA TEERM engineers facilitated a design review meeting between technical representatives from NASA KSC and members of a Department of Energy-funded Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light project team. The objective of the project is to field-test a hydrogen fuel cell mobile light system side-by-side with a conventional diesel generator set for the purpose of collecting operational data at KSC. The novel system uses high-efficiency plasma lighting, and a hydrogen fuel cell to greatly reduce noise; eliminate diesel particulate emissions; increase energy efficiency; and allow both indoor/outdoor applicability. The high color rendering index of the plasma lighting also aids human visual acuity and can therefore help improve employee safety. The new lighting towers are expected to be built and delivered to KSC in late 2010.

Lead-Free Electronic Project Presentation at Aircraft Conference
The TEERM-led Lead-Free Electronics Project was presented during the Tin Whisker technical session of the 13th DOD/NASA/FAA Aircraft Airworthiness & Sustainment Conference in Austin, Texas on May 13, 2010. A team member from the U.S. Air Force gave the presentation. This project is important to NASA and the DOD because of the knowledge that will be gained about the effect of mixing of different lead and lead-free solder alloys on solder joint reliability. At this time, most of the project's accelerated testing is complete and failure analysis has begun.

May 2010

Corn Hybrid Polymer (CHP) Demonstration
NASA TEERM engineers traveled to NASA Johnson Space Center’s El Paso Forward Operating Location (EPFOL) the week of May 24, 2010 to hold meetings and conduct a demonstration of corn hybrid polymer media blasting for aerospace applications. EPFOL is the entity responsible for one of the three phases of refurbishment of NASA’s T-38 aircraft. The combination of attendees from the technology vendor and NASA JSC and El Paso (both managers and technicians) enabled critical technical exchange necessary for implementation consideration. While there, NASA TEERM also discussed pollution prevention opportunities for reducing EPFOL’s hazardous waste streams through implementation of environmentally preferable materials and processes.

March 2010

International Meeting on Encroachment Risk Mitigation
On March 11, 2010, representatives from NASA HQ, NASA TEERM, and the Portuguese Center for Pollution Prevention (C3P) hosted a videoconference about encroachment risk mitigation at the U.S. Embassy in Lisbon with the main aim of clarifying the subject concept through practical exercises and answering doubts raised by the participants.

The videoconference was chaired by NASA Assistant Administrator for Infrastructure, Olga Dominguez. NASA HQ presentations about encroachment activities, climate change impacts, and adaptation were made. Encroachment from the U.S. Navy and Military perspective was introduced by TEC, Inc. The Ministry of the Environment of Portugal addressed the topic of strategy and measures for adaptation to climate change.

The conference was attended by representatives from the Portuguese Army, Navy, and Air Force Staffs, the National Commission for Climate Change, and various private entities, namely ISQ - Instituto de Soldadura e Qualidade, NAER - New Lisbon Airport, Association of Insurance Companies, Trivalor Group, ETE Group, and ITB, Inc.

January 2010

Hexavalent Chrome-free Coating Systems Project
NASA TEERM has completed the first (6-month) inspection of exposed panels and completed 2000-hour salt fog testing for the TEERM Hexavalent Chrome-Free Coating Systems project. The goal of this project is to identify viable alternatives to hexavalent chromium used in aluminum pretreatments and primer coatings for aerospace vehicles. Coated test panels are being exposed at the KSC Beach Corrosion test site and LC-39B for 18 months. Project findings to date show that some of the chrome-free coating systems are performing as well as the hexavalent chrome coatings. Implementation of a viable chrome-free coating system would reduce worker health and safety risks and reduce mission risk that could arise if coatings vendors decide to stop making coatings containing hexavalent chromium. Project team members are comprised of representatives from NASA, the Air Force, and the commercial sector.

Laser Technology For Productivity in Tomorrow’s Depots
NASA TEERM attended by invitation only the DoD’s workshop titled “Laser Technology for Productivity in Tomorrow’s Depots” on January 7-8, 2010 at the Shades of Green facility in Orlando, FL. Topics were focused on laser applications and processes at DoD facilities as well as advances in lasers and laser processing for sustainment. NASA TEERM interests are in using laser technology in lieu of chemicals for coating/adhesive removal from various substrates and titanium surface preparation for better adhesion purposes.

Aerospace & Defense Lead (Pb)-Free Electronics Risk Management (PERM) Consortium
NASA TEERM attended the third Aerospace & Defense Lead (Pb)-Free Electronics Risk Management (PERM) Consortium meeting on January 5, 2010 in Oak Ridge, TN to present on the NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project. The PERM was established to provide overarching leadership and coordination of Pb-free electronics risk management activities for the government and industry aerospace and defense community. Consortium members reported that increasingly, electronic components and hardware are no longer available in conventional tin-lead solder and instead are only being supplied with lead-free materials. The properties and performance of many of these new lead-free materials (solder alloys/component finishes) is not well understood, and therefore presents a risk to electronic systems.

International Workshop is a Success
NASA TEERM participated in meetings and events in Germany in concert with its Portuguese partner, C3P during November 2009. A C3P/NASA International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy was held at the GE Global Research Center in Garching, (near Munich) Germany. The workshop provided forum showcased innovative and emerging pollution prevention and renewable energy technologies, shared lessons learned, and identified new joint opportunities. Five European countries had representation in attendance, including students and professors from U.S. and German universities. The workshop concluded with a tour of GE’s gas engine manufacturing plant in Jenbach, Austria. GE's Jenbacher gas engines range in power from 0.25 to 4 MW and run on either natural gas or a variety of other gases (e.g., biogas, landfill gas, coal mine gas, sewage gas, combustible industrial waste gases). Presentations from past workshops are available.

September 2009

Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP) Chair Transition
Meetings were held with Army Materials Command personnel at Redstone Arsenal last week regarding transitioning the JG-PP Chairmanship role from NASA to Army. The Army Chairmanship role will be in effect October 1, 2009. NASA accepted the role as chairman of the Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP) in October 2007 (transitioned from the Marines). JG-PP was charted by the Department of Defense in 1994 to reduce duplication of effort within the DoD when qualifying new, environmentally preferable materials or processes. The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) was created in 1998 (under the original name NASA Acquisition Pollution Prevention or AP2) to support JG-PP and be the NASA focal point for agency-wide pollution prevention activities. NASA has benefited greatly from its association with JG-PP and the numerous projects JG-PP has undertaken. Like TEERM, all JG-PP test plans and test reports are free and publicly available. These reports and other JG-PP information can be found at http://www.jgpp.com.

NASA TEERM Assists HQ with Energy/Water Plans
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) is working with NASA HQ Environmental Management Division to develop a NASA-wide energy/water strategic plan and an energy/water management action plan. The action plan will cover all current mandates for federal facilities and discuss an ongoing effort to provide useful feedback from NASA HQ to the centers and component facilities. In order to facilitate this, TEERM engineers have been developing “Center Dashboards” that show at a glance the current scorecards for key metrics, including energy/water intensity, renewable energy usage, and funding needs. Additionally, the dashboards are planned to include fleet vehicles and green house gas metrics when data is made available. The concept of the action plan is to give guidance to center energy/water managers and to provide information on center requirements for the development of center-level strategic/action plans.

August 2009

TEERM Program Management Review
NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division (EMD) conducted a Program Management Review (PMR) of the NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) in Florida the week of July 27th. The primary objective of the PMR was to evaluate the progress of TEERM activities and examine improvements to increase efficiency, effectiveness and quality. Presently, TEERM is managing 5 and developing 8 new demonstration/ validation projects designed to qualify or evaluate new materials or processes to reduce NASA’s risk to mission. TEERM also supports and monitors several other projects by partner organizations. As part of the PMR, TEERM and EMD were able to further collaborate and make key decisions for the C3P/NASA 2009 International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy. The workshop will occur from November 11-13, 2009, at the GE Global Research Munich facility.

July 2009

NASA Environmental Meetings in Europe
Representatives from NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division and the NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center met with partners in Portugal and Germany. NASA met with counterparts at the Portuguese Center for Pollution Prevention Program (C3P) to review joint U.S. - Portugal projects. Meetings in Germany finalized the use of the US Consulate facility for the Joint Oversight Group annual meeting and discussions with GE Global Research in Munich resulted in finalizing decisions regarding speakers and further details involving the use of GE facilities during the C3P/NASA 2009 International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy – “GLOBAL COLLABORATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND ALTERNATIVE ENERGY STRATEGIES". The workshop will occur from November 11-13, 2009, at the GE Global Research Munich facility.

June 2009

Environmental Workshop in Germany
TEERM, in concert with its partner in Portugal, C3P and GE Global Research in Germany, is holding a technical workshop on environmental and alternative energy strategies in Munich, Germany, November 10-12, 2009. You may register for the workshop by completing the online registration. There is no fee, but space is limited, so register now. If you are interested in presenting at the workshop, provide a brief description (200 words or less) of the topic in the online registration page, Question 2, before August 1.

May 2009

Shuttle Environmental Assurance Initiative (SEA)
Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) personnel attended and presented at the Face-to-Face meeting of the Shuttle Environmental Assurance Initiative (SEA) team on April 28-29, 2009, in Houston, Texas.  Attendees included NASA personnel from Headquarters, multiple centers, and contractors, including representatives from NASA’s International Space Station and Constellation Programs.  The role of SEA is to support mission execution through the life cycle of the Space Shuttle Program by mitigating the risks of materials obsolescence as a result of environmental, health, or safety regulations.  Lessons learned from the Space Shuttle Program are also being disseminated to the Constellation Program through meetings such as these.  Through participation Constellation recognizes the value of implementing a SEA-like group to address materials obsolescence issues that could affect the new mission and is assessing the transition of this function.

April 2009

Meeting of the Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP)
An annual meeting of the Principal members of the Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP) occurred April 15, 2009 in Arlington, VA.  The group is currently chaired by NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division at the Principal level and NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) at the Working Group level.  During an Executive Session, the Army agreed to chair the group beginning in FY10.

Biobased (Corn) Blast Media “Show and Tell” at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) hosted an all day demonstration of corn hybrid polymer (CHP) blast media technology on April 2nd at the Kennedy Space Center Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) (Building M7-0360). TEERM invited anyone at KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) interested in environmentally preferable depainting operations to attend this “show and tell”.  TEERM is supporting NASA’s evaluation of corn hybrid polymer (CHP) blast media as a potential drop-in replacement for the current media used to de-coat delicate substrates at various NASA centers.

March 2009 - No notable news.

February 2009

Corrosion Control Facility Goes Green Initiative
TEERM has teamed with Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Environmental, the KSC Corrosion Technology Laboratory, and the KSC Ransom Road Corrosion Control Facility on the “Corrosion Control Facility Goes Green Initiative.”  The purpose of the initiative is to identify, validate, and implement environmentally preferable corrosion protection technologies at the Corrosion Control Facility.  The first project is currently underway and is evaluating thermal spray coatings and topcoats.  Test panels have been prepared and placed at the KSC corrosion beach site.  This project is closely associated with other TEERM projects in which thermal spray coatings, gas dynamic spray coatings, and topcoats are being demonstrated for NASA and Air Force Space Command sites.

Lead-Free Electronics Project
NASA TEERM has completed assembly of 195 circuit cards to be tested for reliability in a joint NASA-DoD project.  BAE Systems, Irving, Texas, provided the test vehicle assembly as in-kind contribution to the project.  The objective of the laboratory effort is to assess the reliability of circuit cards soldered with new lead-free alloys.  The assembled test boards will be subjected to accelerated testing (thermal, vibration, shock, etc.) to simulate real world conditions.  Results of the testing will allow participating organizations to make informed decisions about lead-free implementation or mitigation strategies.

TEERM Program Management Review
NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division (EMD) conducted a Program Management Review (PMR) of the NASA TEERM in Florida the week of February 2.  The primary objective of the PMR was to evaluate the progress of TEERM activities and examine improvements to increase efficiency, effectiveness and quality.  Presently, TEERM is managing 10 demonstration/ validation projects designed to qualify or evaluate new materials or processes to reduce NASA’s risk to mission.  TEERM also supports and monitors more than a dozen other projects by partner organizations.  As part of the PMR, TEERM staff led EMD personnel on tours of some project testing locations, notably Launch Complex 39A (Shuttle hypergolic fueling), Launch Complex 17 & LC-18 (coated test articles), and the Kennedy Space Center beach corrosion test site.

January 2009

Hexavalent Chrome-free Coating Systems Project
NASA TEERM has begun the second phase of testing on a joint NASA-DoD project to evaluate the viability of new coating systems that are entirely free of hexavalent chromium. Historically, high corrosion resistance offered by chromated films is attributed to the presence of both hexavalent and trivalent chromium in the coating. The trivalent chromium is present as an insoluble hydrated oxide, whereas the hexavalent chromium imparts a “self-healing” characteristic to the coating during an oxidative (corrosive) attack. Chromated coatings also play a critical role in supporting and enhancing the adhesion of the primer coating to the substrate. TEERM's project is focused on the performance of coatings applied to commonly used aluminum alloys as well as NASA-specific lithium-aluminum and high-copper alloys used on space flight hardware. Testing is in accordance with a Joint Test Plan that meets the specific critical performance requirements of all the project team members. The project builds off prior TEERM efforts that include the NASA/DoD phase one testing of five alternatives and the NASA/Center for Portuguese Pollution Prevention (C3P) project where chrome-free systems were flight tested on a Airbus A-380 commercial aircraft.

ECOS Network Project
NASA TEERM's partner in Portugal, the Centro Para Prevenção da Poluição (Portuguese Center for Pollution Prevention or C3P), was awarded funding to begin working with Portugal municipalities to increase the energy efficiency of buildings using renewable energies and sustainable construction. The aim is to create competitive and innovative cities at an international level. During the proposal process, TEERM supported C3P by providing examples of U.S. city best practices in sustainability. The project was one of only five (from 26 submitted) that was selected for funding.

December 2008 - No notable news.

November 2008

C3P/NASA International Workshop on Pollution Prevention and Sustainable Design
TEERM, in concert with its partner in Portugal, the Centro Para Prevenção da Poluição (Portuguese Center for Pollution Prevention or C3P), attended and managed an International Workshop on Pollution Prevention and Sustainable Development in San Diego, CA on November 18-20, 2008.  The theme of the event was “Enhancing Mission through Proactive Environmental Risk Mitigation”, and was highlighted by a stimulating NASA panel discussion on how to incorporate elements of sustainability into a human lunar mission.  More than 100 individuals from 5 countries attended the workshop, including students and professors from the University of California at San Diego, which hosted the event.  At the Workshop’s technical sessions, more than 45 U.S. and international subject matter experts presented slides on topics ranging from sustainability and renewable energies to European Union restricted chemicals to advances in materials and conventional processes, such as coating, coating removal, and electronics soldering.  Further information can be found at Environmental Energy Conference 2008.

October 2008

C3P/NASA International Workshop on Pollution Prevention and Sustainable Design
TEERM, in concert with its partner in Portugal, the Centro Para Prevenção da Poluição (Portuguese Center for Pollution Prevention or C3P), is planning an International Workshop on Pollution Prevention and Sustainable Development in San Diego, CA on November 18-20, 2008.  The theme of the event is “enhancing mission through proactive environmental risk mitigation”.  The event is being hosted by the University of California at San Diego.  Further information can be found at Environmental Energy Conference 2008.

Shuttle Transition Planning
A meeting of the Shuttle Environmental Assurance Initiative (SEA) occurred October 21-22 in Huntsville, AL.  Attendees included TEERM staff and NASA employees and contractors, including representatives from NASA’s Constellation Program.  Requested presentations were provided by TEERM covering program updates and status on many of TEERM projects supporting SEA’s Element Updates agenda topic.  In addition, TEERM provided a requested presentation on the joint hexavalent chromium project supporting SEA’s Technical Crosstalk on Hexavalent Chromium agenda topic.  Lessons learned from the Shuttle Program are being conveyed to Constellation through meetings such as these.  The role of SEA is to support mission execution through the life cycle of the Space Shuttle Program by identifying materials that may become obsolete as result of environment, health and safety regulations and mitigating these risks through teamwork.  Constellation is seriously considering implementing a SEA-like group to address materials obsolescence issues that could affect the new mission.

September 2008

NASA Environmental and Energy Conference
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) assisted NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division with the NASA Environmental and Energy (E&E) Conference at Langley Research Center on September 22-25.  The E&E Conference is held every other year and its purpose is to strengthen communication and promote synergy across the Agency's environmental management community, provide opportunities to share innovative risk mitigation measures and best management practices, and increase awareness of across the NASA workforce of the Agency's successes and ongoing challenges in environmental stewardship.  Topics discussed this year included Energy/Water Efficiency, Materials Obsolescence and Management, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Climate Change/Green House Gases, Cultural Resources, Environmental Management System (EMS), Emerging Contaminants/Cleanup, and Recycling and Affirmative Procurement /Pollution Prevention. 

Energy and Water Management Functional Review
KSC contractor ITB, Inc. assisted NASA Headquarters (HQ) with Energy and Water Management Functional Reviews (EWMFR) at Johnson Space Center (JSC).  Federal energy and water management requirements such as the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and Executive Order 13423 establish primary performance metrics for reducing energy intensity, reducing water intensity, and increasing renewable energy use.  The review assessed how JSC’s energy and water management program supports the NASA mission by pursuing compliance with Federal requirements.  The review also provides a two-way street that enables NASA HQ to learn and assess the health of the sites energy and water programs while enabling the site to identify support needed from HQ.  The EWMFR is performed in tandem with the Environmental Functional Review that includes both management and technical reviews.

August 2008

Energy Efficiency Panel Meeting
NASA KSC contractor ITB, Inc. assisted NASA HQ in conducting its annual face-to-face Energy Efficiency Panel (EEP) meeting August 7, 2008, in Phoenix, Arizona.  The EEP meeting followed the GovEnergy 2008 Federal energy/water training workshop, at which KSC was well-represented.  At the EEP meeting, ITB’s Al Sorkin made a presentation featuring the Department of Energy’s “Existing Building Assessment Tool” for high performance sustainable buildings as a way to fulfill Executive Order 13423’s requirement that 15% of each Federal agency’s existing capital asset building inventory have incorporated sustainable practices by end of FY 2015.

Gas Dynamic Spray Demonstration Project
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) has completed the Joint Test Protocol for a project to demonstrate Gas Dynamic Spray (GDS) technology.  GDS uses kinetic force at low pressure to produce coatings or freestanding deposits by solid state deformation; no volatile organic chemicals or hazardous air pollutants are emitted.  The lower temperatures avoid oxidation, metallurgical transformation, or residual stresses.  A variety of materials can be used and specialized coatings created.  The focus of this demonstration will be using Cold Spray as a means of repairing thermal spray coatings that have been damaged or areas where thermal spray coatings are less effective.  The technology can result in reduced maintenance and thus reduced hazardous materials/wastes associated with current processes.

July 2008

NASA Environmental and Energy Conference
NASA Environmental Management Division is holding a biennial Environmental and Energy Conference at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA on September 22-25, 2008. The purpose of this conference is to strengthen communication and promote synergy across the Agency's environmental management community, provide opportunities to share innovative risk mitigation measures and best management practices, and increase awareness of across the NASA workforce of the Agency's successes and ongoing challenges in environmental stewardship. NASA TEERM is assisting HQ in planning this event. For more information see the conference web site: Environmental Energy Conference 2008.

June 2008

Latest TEERM Newsletter, QuEST, Available
The latest edition (Volume 3) of TEERM’s annual newsletter, QuEST, is now available.

NASA Pollution Prevention & Sustainability Workshop Planned for November 2008
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM), in concert with its partner in Portugal, C3P, is planning a technical symposium on pollution prevention and sustainable development in San Diego, CA on November 18-20, 2008.  The theme of the event is “enhancing mission through proactive environmental risk mitigation.”  The University of California at San Diego is the host.  The registration period has begun.  Further information can be found at Environmental Energy Conference 2008.

Corn Hybrid Polymer Blast Media Technology Demonstration
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) hosted a demonstration of a corn hybrid polymer blast media technology on April 28 and May 5 at the Corrosion Control Facility (Building M6-1625) at Kennedy Space Center.  Approximately 30 employees and contractors from NASA Kennedy Space Center and the U.S. Air Force attended the demonstration.  Participant surveys indicate an overwhelmingly positive response to the performance of the product as well as the recycling process. Corn hybrid polymer media is being evaluated as a reliable substitute for the current plastic media used to de-coat delicate substrates at KSC and CCAFS.  The next phase of the project will be to validate the technology by Materials and Processes to see if the media can be implemented, thereby reducing or potentially eliminating a large waste stream generated by de-coating operations.

Demonstration of VOC Emission Reduction Technology at Wallops
In May 2008, the NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) conducted the third demonstration of a novel semi-permeable membrane technology for reducing volatile organic chemical (VOC) emissions.  The technology offers the possibility of collecting VOC emissions and re-using or recycling them in the future.  The focus of the demonstration was VOC emissions from the soil vapor extraction unit of a remediation site contaminated with jet fuel at NASA Wallops Flight Facility.  TEERM expects to evaluate the unit at other sites within or outside NASA to get comparative data.  The technology is not limited to remediation sites, but can be used to capture such pollutants from any entrained air stream.  The test platform containing the membrane modules was designed to be transportable in order to test the technology at several locations.  An earlier version of this membrane technology was tested at NASA Kennedy Space Center on a smaller scale in 2001.

Certified Energy Manager Examination Passed
Ms. Susan Valek, lead for the Energy/Water Management Task for the NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM), passed the Certified Energy Manager® (CEM®) examination offered by the Association of Energy Engineers.  The CEM® credential recognizes individuals who have demonstrated high levels of experience, competence, proficiency, and ethical fitness in the energy management profession.  It has gained industry-wide use as the standard for qualifying energy professionals both in the United States and abroad.  The Energy/Water Management Task was created to support NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division in meeting the requirements of federal regulatory requirements and reducing energy costs to the Agency.

May 2008

Energy/Water Management
NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM)’s Energy/Water Management Task has completed its first awards call for the Presidential Awards for Leadership in Energy Management and Federal Energy and Water Management Awards, inviting nominations from Energy/Water Management, Facilities, and Transportation at all NASA sites. 

The Energy/Water Management Task also has revised the "NASA Annual Report to the Department of Energy FY 2007" to provide updated information on buildings subject to energy and water management goals.

April 2008

Joint Group on Pollution Prevention Meeting
The annual meeting of the Principal members of the Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP) occurred April 8 in Washington, D.C.  Representatives from NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division and NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM POC: John Herrington) attended.  NASA is the acting chair of JG-PP, and at the meeting agreed to continue to chair the group through FY09.  Some key Principal decisions from the meeting include: agreeing to modernize JG-PP’s mission statement to include environmentally driven risk to mission; inviting the U.S. Coast Guard to be a member; and reinvigorating defense and space contractor participation in JG-PP projects.  NASA and DoD having partnered on numerous JG-PP technology demonstration/validation projects since the 1990s; new projects continue to be developed in the areas of environmentally friendly cleaning, coatings, depainting, plating, green electronics, and biobased materials.

Air Force Tour of Launch Coatings Demonstration Site
Representatives from Air Force Space Command (AFSPC), the Air Force Research Laboratory, University of Dayton Research Institute, and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station met with staff from the Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (Project POC: Pattie Lewis Burford) and Corrosion Technology Laboratory at NASA Kennedy Space Center during the week of March 24 to make plans for a new project to test advanced coatings on launch structures. Environment friendly durable coatings are desired that can withstand the extreme temperatures and corrosive exhaust gases from multiple launches, thereby reducing required maintenance and environmental impacts while improving mission readiness. Tours of the Beach Site Corrosion Test Bed and Launch Complex 17 were conducted.  LC17 is the likely site for coatings testing.  KSC and Stennis Space Center have interest in the project. The project is a continuation of multiple projects in which NASA and AFSPC also partnered.

Lead-Free Airworthiness Advisory and TEERM
The U.S. Air Force (USAF) has recognized the efforts of NASA TEERM in evaluating the reliability of lead-free electronics.  The Headquarters Aeronautical Systems Center located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base released an Airworthiness Advisory (AA-08-02) on March 31, 2008 providing information on the trend within the electronics manufacturing community toward the use of lead (Pb)-free solder.  The Advisory references NASA TEERM's two lead-free electronics projects (Project POC: Kurt Kessel).  To date, no lead-free solders are known to have met the reliability requirements imposed upon military electronics.  At the same time, many electronic items being acquired by the USAF and DoD may already contain lead-free solder due to electronics manufacturers’ use of solely lead-free solder.  Until such time that a suitable, reliable, lead-free solder replacement is identified, all program managers should ensure their electronic equipment suppliers continue to provide items which meet all performance, compatibility, and reliability requirements. Failure to do so could adversely affect the reliability of weapons and space systems. This standpoint is shared by NASA’s prohibition of pure tin as a final finish on electrical, electronic, and electromechanical (EEE) parts.

March 2008

NASA Participation at C.S.I.M.P. Conference
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM), NASA Principal Center for Regulatory Risk Analysis and Communication (RRAC PC), and the NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division (HQ EMD) presented at the 18th Annual Cleaner, Sustainable Industrial Materials & Processes (C.S.I.M.P.) Workshop.  The C.S.I.M.P. Workshop’s focus is reducing the use of potential harmful substances, conserving energy, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and minimizing the costs of maintenance by utilizing environmentally compatible approaches; all part of the TEERM mission.  Mr. James Leatherwood, Director HQ EMD and Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP) Chairman, was a featured keynote speaker.  The RRAC PC spoke of their tools in identifying risks to NASA from emerging regulations.  The TEERM Manager discussed the Principal Center’s purpose and methodology while TEERM engineers highlighted projects of interest to the group.

Isocyanate-free Coatings Project
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) will present on the Isocyanate-free Coatings for Structural Steel project at the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) 2008 Corrosion Conference on March 18, in New Orleans, LA.  The presentation will give an overview of the results of the 18-Month Marine Exposure Testing and prove that environmentally preferable coatings can protect as well as conventional systems.  Based on the results of testing, five coating systems showed favorable performance and were added to the NASA technical standard NASA-STD-5008A, Protective Coating of Carbon Steel, Stainless Steel, and Aluminum on Launch Structures, Facilities, and Ground Support Equipment.  The project was a joint effort between TEERM, Air Force Space Command, Kennedy Space Center, Stennis Space Center, and the KSC Corrosion Technology Laboratory.

February 2008

TEERM Lead-Free Project Presented to Joint Service Lead-Free Technical Committee
The Joint Service Lead-Free Technical Committee (JSLFTC) requested and received a presentation on the TEERM Managed NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project in Macon, GA, at the Raytheon Systems facility on February 6, 2008.  JSLFTC members consist of DoD (Army, NAVAIR, NAVSEA, Air Force, DMEA, DMA, USCG), FAA & NASA.  The project’s primary technical objective is to undertake comprehensive testing to generate information on failure modes/criteria to better understand the reliability of packages assembled and reworked with lead-free alloys and mixed (lead/lead-free) alloys.

January 2008

Orion Surface Finishes Team Visits KSC
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) hosted NASA’s Lead for the Orion Surface Finishes Team during his visit to KSC on January 22, 2008.  The Finishes Team, based at JSC, is identifying performance requirements and coatings to be used on the Orion crew exploration vehicle.  The likelihood of new alloys and materials being used on Orion warrants further study of ways to reduce their corrosion.  Part of the team’s purview is reducing corrosion with coatings that do not contain harmful chemicals, such as hexavalent chromium.  During the visit to KSC, the Orion representative toured the Corrosion Technology Laboratory and the Beachside Atmospheric Test Facility at KSC to better understand the capabilities of KSC in the area of corrosion protection and coatings analysis.  The Team Lead also met with the NASA TEERM Manager to discuss past and pending NASA projects dealing with the identification and testing of non-chrome coatings.

TEERM Awareness Meeting with Ares 1 TPS
In response to an invite, a Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) program overview was presented to the Ares 1 TPS team at MSFC on January 17, 2008.  The MSFC team commented on the TEERM flexibility, cross-program visibility and ESA connection attributes.  Areas of mutual interest and collaboration opportunities were identified for follow on discussions. 

Energy/Water Management
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) assisted NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division (HQ EMD) in compiling the NASA Annual Report to the Department of Energy FY 2007.  The report contains information on how well NASA is meeting federally mandated energy and water management goals, in accordance with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the newly enacted Executive Order 13423.  FY 2007 marks the first year of reporting against EO 13423 requirements.  FY 2007 is also the baseline year for new water conservation goals.  Kennedy Space Center has reduced energy consumption 7.64% since the baseline year FY 2003, which compares favorably to the goal for NASA as a whole of 6.0%.  TEERM support is credited with allowing HQ EMD to submit this important federal report on time.

December 2007

Energy Pilot Project Installed on Portugal Island
In December 2007, the first of several planned solar photovoltaic panels was installed on Portugal’s Berlenga Island to produce electrical energy at the island.  The project is a partnership between NASA and Portuguese partners, namely NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM), C3P, EDP – Energias de Portugal, Portuguese Navy, EFACEC and Municipality of Peniche.  The pilot system is composed of 12 photovoltaic panels with a total 1.8 kW installed power.  A total of 24 batteries permit the energy storage.  TEERM is collaborating with the project team to help recommend water and wastewater technologies for possible future installation on the island, as well as communicate lessons learned back to NASA’s renewable energy initiatives.

Shuttle Transition Planning
A meeting of the Shuttle Environmental Assurance Initiative (SEA) occurred December 4-5 in Huntington Beach, CA.  Attendees included TEERM staff and NASA employees and contractors, including representatives from NASA’s Constellation Program.  Lessons learned from the Shuttle Program are being conveyed to Constellation through meetings such as these.  The role of SEA is to support mission execution through the life cycle of the Space Shuttle Program by identifying materials that may become obsolete as result of environment, health and safety regulations and mitigating these risks through teamwork.  Constellation is seriously considering implementing a SEA-like group to address materials obsolescence issues that could affect the new mission.     

Isocyanate Urethane Alternatives Project
NASA TEERM has completed a project that identified isocyanate-free coating systems for use on structural steel.  Stennis Space Center (SSC) has banned the use of isocyanate-containing coating systems, and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has cited concerns about continued use of isocyanates.  TEERM selected coatings for testing that met strict environmental and performance requirements.  Ultimately, five systems were approved and will be added to the Qualified Products List in NASA-STD-5008, which is used across NASA and referenced by the military services.  This was a joint project with SSC, KSC, the KSC Corrosion Technology Laboratory, and Air Force Space Command.  Additional information about the project, including project documents, can be found on the TEERM website.

November 2007

C3P-NASA International Workshop on Pollution Prevention and Sustainable Development
NASA teamed with the Portuguese Center for Pollution Prevention (C3P) to organize the 5th Annual C3P-NASA International Workshop on Pollution Prevention and Sustainable Development on November 7-9, 2007, in Peniche, Portugal.  The workshop provided an excellent forum for up-to-date information on environmental and energy concerns that are common to Portuguese, European and U.S. industries, as well as information on ongoing and future projects.  In total, 243 individuals from 8 countries (Portugal, USA, Netherlands, Spain, Finland, Italy, Poland, and Germany) attended the technical workshop, and more than 45 international experts presented.  Opening session speakers included Olga Dominguez (NASA HQ), Patrick Simpkins (KSC), the U.S. Ambassador to Portugal, and Portugal’s Secretary of State for the Environment.  The next workshop will be held in the United States.

Constellation/Exploration - TEERM Collaboration with CEV M&P
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) recently met with the materials and processes (M&P) technical discipline for the Orion/CEV (Crew Exploration Vehicle) Project at NASA Johnson Space Center and identified an opportunity to collaborate on ongoing evaluations of material systems for corrosion protection on the Orion spacecraft.  TEERM was invited to become an active member of the “Orion Finishes Team” that is attempting to select, test, and evaluate for design the corrosion protection finishes for the entire Orion vehicle.  This is a breakthrough in Constellation mission support and is part of TEERM’s activity to collaborate across the Agency on the validation and implementation of hexavalent chrome free coatings.  Further discussions are planned in the coming months to better understand KSC’s corrosion testing capabilities and coordination of proposed testing.

October 2007

NASA to Chair Joint Pollution Prevention Group
In October 2007, NASA accepted the role as chairman of the Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP).  JG-PP was charted by the Department of Defense in 1994 to reduce duplication of effort within the DoD when qualifying new, environmentally preferable materials or processes.  The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) was created in 1998 (under the original name NASA Acquisition Pollution Prevention or AP2) to support JG-PP and be the NASA focal point for agency-wide pollution prevention activities.  NASA has benefited greatly from its association with JG-PP and the numerous projects JG-PP has undertaken.  Like TEERM, all JG-PP test plans and test reports are free and publicly available.  These reports and other JG-PP information can be found at http://www.jgpp.com.

Endorsement of the C3P and NASA Technical Workshop
The President of Portugal, Prof. Anibal Cavaco Silva has endorsed the “Partnering for Energy and Environmental Stewardship” Center for Pollution Prevention Portugal (C3P) and NASA Technical Workshop being held in Peniche, Portugal November 7-9, 2007. Kennedy Space Center Director William Parsons was scheduled to be the workshop's keynote speaker and has asked Dr. Patrick Simpkins, Director of Engineering at KSC, to conduct the keynote speech due to other commitments preventing his attendance. C3P and KSC's Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) have been coordinating joint workshops for the past few years to share knowledge on new technologies for reduce pollution and energy consumption.

September 2007

Demonstration of VOC Emissions Reduction Technology at Wallops
In August 2007, the NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) demonstrated a novel semi-permeable membrane technology for reducing volatile organic chemical (VOC) emissions from a soil vapor extraction unit of a remediation site contaminated with jet fuel at Wallops Flight Facility (WFF). Presently, no VOC reduction technologies are associated with the remediation site, and WFF is permitted to emit these VOCs directly to the air. In the TEERM-WFF demonstration, the hollow-fiber membranes proved able to remove VOCs from the extracted air stream, condensing them into a liquid. The technology also offers the option of re-using or recycling the captured VOCs. The membrane unit is fully transportable. Further testing of the membrane unit (with modifications) at WFF is planned in the next few weeks. TEERM is considering evaluating the unit at other demonstration sites within or outside NASA. An earlier version of this membrane technology was tested in 2001 at NASA Kennedy Space Center.

August 2007

New Manager for TEERM
Mr. Charles (Chuck) Griffin has been named Manager of the NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM).  Kennedy Space Center (KSC)  has been the Principal Center for TEERM since 1998. Mr. Griffin is responsible for spearheading initiatives to reduce pollution and to minimize or eliminate the use of hazardous materials and volatile organic compounds in the design, production, and operation of NASA programs.  He will also assume the duties as working group chairman of NASA/Department of Defense Joint Group on Pollution Prevention, tasked with combining resources to find solutions to common environmental problems.  Previously, Mr. Griffin spent 10 years in the NASA Technology Programs & Partnerships Branch, the last 5 years as manager of the SBIR/STTR Program.  Mr. Griffin has 35 years with NASA at KSC and has held numerous positions within the Design Engineering Directorate.

Gas Dynamic Spray Technology Demonstration
The NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) recently teamed with Air Force Space Command, Patrick Air Force Base, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, and JBOSC to demonstrate Gas Dynamic Spray Technology at John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida.  Also commonly called cold spray, the technology uses a gas jet to accelerate particles to supersonic velocities, producing coatings or freestanding deposits by solid state deformation of the impacting particles onto a substrate.  The focus of this demonstration was on steel substrate, but the technology can be used on a variety of substrates.  The technology can result in reduced hazardous waste generation.  For further information, contact Pattie Lewis Burford at (321) 867-9163.

January 2007

NAME CHANGE - The Acquisition Pollution Prevention (AP2) Program Office is now known as the Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) Principal Center

November 2006

2006 Workshop Presentations now available.

April 2006

Quest Newsletter released.